Norwegian envoy asks parties to resolve prevailing security, governance challenges

The Ambassador of the kingdom of Norway to South Sudan, Linken Berryman on Thursday urged the parties to the 2018 revitalized peace agreement to utilize it to discuss and resolve the prevailing security, governance and humanitarian challenges.
Linken Berryman, Norwegian Ambassador to South Sudan.

By Simon Deng

The Ambassador of the kingdom of Norway to South Sudan, Linken Berryman on Thursday urged the parties to the 2018 revitalized peace agreement to utilize it to discuss and resolve the prevailing security, governance and humanitarian challenges.

 “The peace agreement presents an opportunity that has set South Sudan on a path to sustainable peace. It offers the most effective platform to discuss and resolve the security, governance, economic and humanitarian challenges that continue to challenge South Sudan,” said Berryman during the workshop organized by the ceasefire monitors (CTSAMVM) ahead of International Women’s’ Day held at Dembesh Hotel in Juba.

International Women’s Day is celebrated annually on March 8th.

Berryman emphasized the need for the transitional unity government to empower women to participate in peacebuilding and conflict resolution.

“Not only is it important to support women’s participation in peacebuilding and conflict resolution processes, but information about the peace process is also crucial in enabling effective participation among the South Sudanese population,” she said.

Berryman called on CTSAMVM to work closely with it’s Monitoring and Verification Teams across South Sudan to deliver its core mandate, adding that inclusive implementation of the provisions of the Permanent Ceasefire, and specifically on the Protection of civilians is  needed.

The workshop was attended by members of the diplomatic community, civil society organizations, UN representatives and representatives from the security sector among others.

It discussed issues related to monitoring, verification and reporting on violations and also the protection of civilians, particularly women, children and people with special needs.

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